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Conservatives Meet in Richmond to Oppose Tax Hikes

AFP shows opposition to Gov. McDonnell’s transportation and support for the ‘Boneta Bill’ to expand definition of agricultural operations.

By Destiny Brandon
Capital News Service
 

One of the country’s leading conservative grassroots organizations is voicing its opposition to tax and fee increases under consideration by the Virginia General Assembly, including Gov. Bob McDonnell’s funding plan for transportation.

Americans for Prosperity, which claims 2.2 million members nationwide, including 85,000 in Virginia, has taken action online and at the state Capitol to try to stop the increases.

Members headed to Richmond from all over the state last week to talk about their legislative priorities.

“Obviously, as a free-market, limited-government group, we are against new taxes,” AFP Virginia State Director Audrey Jackson said. “We are all about keeping taxes low so people have more money in their pocket.”

On its website, the group has issued an “action alert” against House Bill 2313, which would fund McDonnell’s bid to solve the state’s transportation problems. The bill would eliminate Virginia’s 17.5-cents-per-gallon gasoline tax but increase the sales tax from 5 percent to 5.8 percent. It also would raise the registration fees for motor vehicles and trailers.

“While we commend Governor McDonnell for proposing to end the gas tax and prioritizing transportation, we oppose raising registration fees for cars and trucks and oppose the sales tax bump that will result in increased taxes on families and businesses,” AFP said.

Besides opposing higher taxes, the organization supports measures such as House Bill 1430, nicknamed the “Boneta Bill” after Fauquier County farmer Martha Boneta. This bill would expand the definition of agricultural operations to include the sale of products at a farm.

Boneta was involved in a dispute with local government officials who said she didn’t have the proper permits to sell handicrafts and hold events at her farm.

Following the dispute, Delegate L. Scott Lingamfelter (R-31) proposed the “Boneta Bill,” saying it would protect farmers’ property rights.

AFP member Rosemary Bryant wore a “pitchfork patriot” sticker on her lapel in support of Boneta.

“She shouldn’t have to get a permit to have a birthday party for her child; that’s her personal property. It should be her right to throw a party. The whole situation just boggles my mind,” Bryant said.

Fauquier County officials said Boneta needed a permit to hold seasonal events at her farm. The permit would have allowed county staff to confirm that the public had safe access and sufficient parking, as well as adequate restroom facilities.

Supporters of conservative causes came to the AFP rally to learn more about the political process and how they can support like-minded candidates.

“Don’t underestimate what we can do,” said Flint Engleman, president and editor of a conservative blog called “The American Maverick.”

He said that as consumers, conservatives should spend their money with companies and organizations that support conservative causes. His blog compiles a list of such entities.

Also, Engleman said, “Social media has played a core role” in promoting both conservative and liberal causes.

“It’s growing,” he said. “And yes, it’s a major player in politics for sure,” he said.

He encourages people to use Twitter and Facebook to advance the message of free markets and capitalism.

[Capital News Service stories are provided by Virginia Commonwealth University.]

joe brewer February 05, 2013 at 03:41 PM
These nut cases do not want to raise registration fees to pay for metrorail and metrobus that's one thing the nut cases got right.
Ellie Lockwood February 05, 2013 at 04:10 PM
It's conceivable that the "nut cases" are the low information citizens who, while not paying attention, allow the erosion of very basic elements of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Just saying.
joe brewer February 05, 2013 at 04:43 PM
Give us a little more specific info on who and what is being eroded?
Ellie Lockwood February 05, 2013 at 08:59 PM
Well for one example, I think the original post laid out quite specifically the over reach of the Fauquier Board. I think the fine they wanted to impose for having a child's birthday party was several hundred dollars.
joe brewer February 06, 2013 at 12:39 PM
And this farm has how many events a year.

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